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Decarbonising Energy & Transportation: The Long and Short Term Legal Challenges

23-24 January 2018  |  Brussels

Decarbonising-energy-transport

Early Bird Special: 10% discount if you register by 8 January 2018!

The course is designed to provide participants with a deeper knowledge and insight in both the theory and implementation of the issues at stake by examining case studies and real-life examples.

The course is based on an ‘active learning’ method, which promotes close interaction between the participants and instructors. This will be achieved through the combination of an online platform with support materials and interactive exercises, and a participatory approach during the two-day residential training.

 

  • Context

    The creation of a resilient Energy Union with a forward-looking climate change policy is a key ambition of the European Commission as it supports the transition to a secure and competitive low-carbon economy by 2050. At present, the European Union and its Member States are obliged to increase the share of renewable energy in electricity production by 20% and, in the transport sector, by 10% by 2020. But, our markets and institutions are, to a large extent, constructed for conventional energy sources and conventional forms of transport. The challenge is to make markets fit for higher shares of RES and integrate renewable energy into transport markets through the electrification of transport. The Commission’s legislative proposals on its new market design and its Renewable Energy Package, launched in late 2016, are the legislative tools to address them. As it is a critical time for the establishment and implementation of a resilient Energy Union and its climate change policy packages, we will explore the legal framework in which these packages must be realised in practice, alongside in-depth studies on the future role of energy consumers and the challenges for conventional as well as renewable energy producers and other market players.

    After 2020, the EU as a whole will move to a target of 27% for RES produced energy, but the 2030 climate and energy targets do not embrace a new target for RES in transport and the past success rate in view of achieving the 10% target is low. What are the options for moving to a more ambitious policy on transport? What are the legal barriers? What legal instruments are available to pursue a more ambitious ‘whole systems’ policy?

  • The Approach

    Climate Change, the Evolution in Transport, and the New Rules and Systems for the Electrification of Transportation

    This course aims to give an overview of the current state of play and provide an in-depth assessment of the various options for decarbonising road transportation in a sustainable and efficient way, including behavioural changes in the use of vehicles and changes to town planning. Can the proposed new governance mechanisms that are part of the 2030 energy package trigger sectoral transport policies based on renewable energy for the Member States? Is a phasing out of fossil fuels via a more stringent system of eco taxation a pathway to accompany such policies and to stimulate investment? Some EU countries are already en route to the full decarbonisation of their transport sector by 2050 – what is the chosen approach and what can we learn from it? Transportation systems have tremendous environmental impact at global and local level, including the transport modes, their energy supply systems, their emissions and the infrastructures through which we use them – the idividaul mode of transport, the freight and lorry, and public transport, all have their own distinct negative effect. Using large quantities of energy, especially mineral oil, transport emits carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide and noise, and its underlying infrastructure is eating up many ecological systems. Several of the environmental impacts of transport systems have been externalised, implying that the benefits of mobility are realised by a few while the costs are assumed by the general public. Mobility changed geography, working and load centers. Rural areas turned into sleeping belts around bigger cities. Can a change towards a new sustainable transport system alongside a shift toward more decentralised and IT-driven energy demand and supply revitalise different spatial planning models from the past and foster a renaissance of the rural areas, and ease the stress on urban environment… and help to heal the climate? Driverless electric pay-as-you-rent cars may replace much of the car ownership principles.

    Electrification means a huge change in the whole value chain of vehicle use, from production, subcontracting, to delivering parts of the vehicle, its use and maintenance, presenting a considerable societal challenge.

  • Learning Portfolio

    The course is designed to provide participants with a deeper knowledge and insight in both the theory and implementation of the issues at stake by examining case studies and real-life examples, The course is based on an ‘active learning’ method, which promotes close interaction between the participants and instructors. This will be achieved through the combination of an online platform with support materials and interactive exercises, and a participatory approach during the two-day residential training.

  • Course Directors

    Leigh Hancher is Professor of European Law at Tilburg University, part-time Professor at the Florence School of Regulation (EUI), and Of Counsel at the Amsterdam office of Allen & Overy LLP. She is an internationally renowned EU law expert and has counselled firms in a broad range of procedures. She has regularly acted as an adviser to the European Commission and the European Parliament on energy law issues. In addition, Professor Hancher regularly contributes to leading journals, has directed several research projects, and is the author of numerous titles, including EU State Aids, 4th edn (Sweet & Maxwell 2012), Capacity Mechanisms in the EU Energy Market (OUP 2015), and EU Energy Law: EU Competition Law and Energy Markets Volume II (Claeys & Casteels 2016).

    Dörte Fouquet is Partner at Becker Büttner Held (BBH), Brussels Office, and specialises in EU law and international legal relations, with focus on competition, infrastructure, energy and environment. Dörte advises companies, finance institutions, associations, governmental agencies in Germany and other EU Member States, EU institutions and on international level. Prior to joining BBH in 2011, she was Partner at Kuhbier and before that, she worked for the Ministry for the Environment and Energy in Hamburg and Liaison office of Hamburg and Schleswig-Holstein to the European Commission in Brussels. Dörte holds PhD in law from the University of Hamburg.

  • Eligibility and fees

    • General Fee: 950 €
    • Donors, national regulatory authorities and academics, PhD students: 750 €

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