logo-eui RSCAS
FSR

Gas


Gas

Ilaria Conti

Topic of the Month

16.11.2018

Sector coupling and sector integration

FSR Topic of the Month Upgrading the EU gas market: the ultimate challenge? by Ilaria Conti (FSR) Sector coupling and sector integration[1] It is now […] read more

Gas

gas pipelines

Event Highlights

12.11.2018

Towards “Net Zero” Methane Emissions in the Gas Sector – Challenges and Opportunities

On the 15th of October 2018, the Florence School of Regulation and Gas Infrastructure Europe (GIE) jointly organised the policy workshop “Towards “Net Zero” Methane […] read more

Gas

Ilaria Conti

Upgrading the EU gas market: the ultimate challenge?

by Ilaria Conti (FSR)   Target number one: “decarbonisation” The latest European Gas Regulatory Forum, which took place in Madrid on 16-17 October 2018, stood […] read more

Gas

Event Highlights

17.07.2018

How to capture the value of energy storage in EU low carbon energy system?

On the 6th of July 2018, the Florence School of Regulation and Gas Infrastructure Europe (GIE) jointly organised a policy workshop dedicated to ‘The Value […] read more

Gas

News

17.05.2018

Future scenarios for GAS & Electricity: FSR at ENTSO-E and ENTSO-G joint workshop

Brussels, 17th May 2018 Today Maria Olczak (FSR Gas) will participate in the ENTSO-E and ENTSOG joint workshop on the interlinkage between gas and electricity […] read more

Gas

Event Highlights

16.04.2018

Can Renewable Gas Contribute to the EU Decarbonisation Efforts?

Last Monday, the 9th of April 2018, the Florence School of Regulation organised a Policy Workshop “The Renewable Gas Complex and the European Path to […] read more

Gas

Andris Piebalgs

Topic of the Month

28.03.2018

Bottlenecks for delivering renewable gas

Written by Andris Piebalgs FSR Topic of the Month: Renewable Gas #4 Looking at the future of renewable gases or ‘green gas’ in Europe, it is […] read more

Gas

Jean Michel Glachant

News

23.03.2018

FSR in Tokyo! Trading LNG at liquid and flexible hubs

On the 27th of March, Jean-Michel Glachant, Director of the Florence School of Regulation will participate in the workshop on ‘Trading LNG at liquid and […] read more

Gas

The European experience with Renewable Gas

FSR Topic of the Month: Renewable Gas #3 Written by Maria Olczak and Andris Piebalgs   In the 2012 assessment of the biogas development potential in Europe, Floris […] read more

Page 1 of 6123456
gas pipelines

Towards “Net Zero” Methane Emissions in the Gas Sector – Challenges and Opportunities

- Gas

On the 15th of October 2018, the Florence School of Regulation and Gas Infrastructure Europe (GIE) jointly organised the policy workshop “Towards “Net Zero” Methane Emissions in the Gas Sector – Challenges and Opportunities”.

Methane is the second most important anthropogenic GHG after CO2. Although, its annual emissions are only a fraction (less than 5%) of those of CO2, it is much more potent than carbon dioxide. Moreover, methane stays in the atmosphere for only 12 years, whereas 22% of CO2 remains in the atmosphere for an indefinite time (Balcombe, 2018, pp. 9-12). For these reasons, the decrease in methane emissions would have an immediate impact. 

Oil and gas supply chains are the second largest anthropogenic source of methane emissions. Although gas combustion produces less CO2, methane emissions along the value chain may compromise climate benefits associated with the use of gas over other fossil fuels. This issue will become even more important with the progressing decarbonisation of the energy system. As a result, the role of gas in the future of global energy, as a source of flexibility and seasonal storage supporting the electricity system, will depend on the ability of the gas sector to address these environmental concerns.

During the first session of the workshop, representatives from key gas companies and organisations (ENI, Enagas, UNECE, Marcogaz, Gazprom and International Gas Union) presented the voluntary actions and best practices that their companies are undertaking to abate methane emissions. As it turns out, European companies have been active in their pursuit of tackling these issues for a few years now.

However, high uncertainty regarding the measurement of methane emissions and lack of sufficient data transparency may require additional efforts such as more stringent regulation. The second session addressed this, with speakers agreeing that fact-based regulation could have a significant impact on the efficiency of the actions to reduce the methane emissions.

Both gas companies and the European Commission will continue to work on this challenge. One of the workshop outcomes was the inclusion of a statement on methane emissions in the conclusions from the 31st Madrid Forum, which took place on 16-17 October 2018.

The key take-aways:

  • Gas vs coal: Gas has considerably better environmental credentials than other fossil fuels, but its long-term use depends not from the comparison with other fossil fuels, but from the industries advancement in decreasing carbon emissions.
  • The industry: As of the early 1990s, companies based in North America were front-runners of the global efforts to limit methane emissions. European companies are now catching up and in recent years have adopted a set of voluntary actions and best practices.
  • Super emitters: The abatement of methane emissions produced by the super emitters (heavy tail) could be an efficient measure. However, a significant degree of uncertainty regarding the measurement of emissions prevents more concrete regulation and actions.
  • Regulation: Regulation on methane emissions should be performance- and fact- based. The regulation should take into account the size of the regulated companies, as the regulatory burden may affect small and medium enterprises (SMEs) differently than big international companies and impact final consumer prices.
  • Distribution: Gas distribution is a key sector in which the EU could reduce methane emissions.
  • The EU’s global impact: EU regulation on methane emissions may have a significant global influence due to the fact that the EU is the biggest gas importer open to gas supplies from different origins, both pipeline and LNG.
  • The EU Commission is planning to publish the new EU Strategy on Methane Emissions in 2020/2021.

 

Towards “Net Zero” Methane Emissions in the Gas Sector – Challenges and Opportunities

Join FSR Energy & Climate Community

Subscribe to our Newsletter

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST

Your contact information

* indicates required
Choose the type of updates that matter to you:
Data Collection Consent

Florence School of Regulation will use the information you provide on this form to be in touch with you and to provide updates about our upcoming online and residential events, publications and other activities. All you need to do to receive insightful updates from us is to click the button below:

GDPR

We use MailChimp as our marketing automation platform. By clicking below to submit this form, you acknowledge that the information you provide will be transferred to MailChimp for processing in accordance with their Privacy Policy and Terms.